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Thursday, September 5, 2013

National Childhood Injury Prevention Week






In support of National Childhood Injury Prevention Week (September 1-7, 2013), the National Safety Council and Energizer have teamed up to share some important tips every parent should know to help prevent injuries from the ingestion of Coin Lithium batteries to help keep kids safe.

Until this was brought to my attention I have never thought of coin lithium batteries as a danger. If you think about it so many of the children's books contain these little batteries. If you continue to read you will understand why some packaging is so annoying :)

Coin lithium batteries can be found around most homes in everyday items like remote controls, keyless entry devices for your car, flameless candles and children’s books with sound. If ingested, these coin-sized lithium batteries can cause serious chemical burns in as little as two hours.  Yet in a survey conducted by Energizer, 62 percent of parents reported being unaware of the risk associated with coin lithium batteries.

Energizer led the industry by being the first to voluntarily develop packaging for its 20 millimeter coin lithium batteries that meets the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) strict guidelines for child-resistant packaging.  They also developed a national awareness campaign in partnership with Safe Kids Worldwide called The Battery Controlled, which works to alert parents and caregivers to the dangers of swallowing coin lithium batteries. Identifying ways its products can help keep families safe is part of the Energizer commitment to designing its products with people in mind and investing in programs that have a positive impact on the world. that’s positivenergy



Background on CPSC Child-Resistant Packaging

The CPSC imposes strict guidelines to determine if a packaging qualifies as effectively child-resistant. The packaging is tested with groups of children ages 42-51 months and also with senior adults ages 50-70. For a package to be child-resistant, a total of 80% of the children tested must not open the package in a full 10 minutes of testing. To make sure that adults are able to use a child-resistant package properly, 90% of adults tested have up to five minutes, and then another minute in a second test, to open and close the package (if applicable) so that it is child-resistant again.
 
If it is suspected that a child has swallowed a coin lithium battery, it is important to go to the emergency department immediately. For more information on child safety and coin lithium battery safety, please visit nsc.org, www.energizer.com, TheBatteryControlled.com and www.poison.org/battery 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

1 comments:

Lois Jones said...

Shocking how many parents don't realize the danger of batteries!!